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September 2014 Issue

Lockheed Martinís New Software Test bed Mimics Naval Environments
During a demonstration, Lockheed Martinís (Bethesda, Maryland) new maritime test bed enabled the fusion of simulated Aegis radar data with other integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sensor data to provide a comprehensive battlespace picture. Throughout the scenario, the test bed collected, analyzed and processed the data, then distributed to simulated platforms at sea and onshore.

All units had access to integrated ISR-related activities, which in turn improved situational awareness and battle management planning.

The maritime test bed can be linked to the Secret Defense Research and Engineering Network and the Defense Research and Engineering Network.


AMSEC Awarded US Navy Contracts For Support Services, Instruction Modules
U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C., awarded a contract to AMSEC LLC (Virginia, Beach, Virginia) for technical and logistical support services, and material kitting services, for U.S. Navy LCC 19-class Amphibious Command ships. AMSEC will support modernization requirements for USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) and USS Mount Whitney (LCC-20). AMSEC will also provide advanced planning efforts for ship checks, drawings and engineering, as well as marine maintenance and installation. The work is to be completed by July 2019.

AMSEC was also awarded a contract by Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island, to produce interactive multimedia instruction courseware modules for the U.S. Naval Sea Systems Commandís shipboard and schoolhouse training programs for submarine operations and procedures. The work is expected to be completed by July 2019.


Austal Launches LCS-8 For US Navy
Austal USA (Mobile, Alabama) successfully completed the launch of the future USS Montgomery (LCS-8). This vessel is the second of 10 127-meter Independence-variant LCS-class ships Austal has been contracted to build for the U.S. Navy.

The ship is now moored in the Mobile River in front of Austal USAís facility, where it will undergo final outfitting and activation before sea trials and delivery to the Navy.


SSN-784 Successfully Completes First Open-Sea Voyage
The newest and most advanced nuclear-powered attack submarine of the U.S., North Dakota (SSN-784), returned to the General Dynamics Electric Boat (Groton, Connecticut) following the successful completion of its first alpha sea trials. North Dakota is the 11th ship of the Virginia-class.

The trials included a range of submarine and propulsion-plant operations, submerging for the first time, and high-speed runs on and below the surface.


Mexican Navy to use NAUTIS For Officer Training
The Mexican Navy selected VSTEP (Rotterdam, Netherlands) to supply a Class A NAUTIS Full Mission Bridge (FMB) Simulator and 24 NAUTIS desktop trainer stations for the Naval Academy in Veracruz.

The simulators will be installed at the new simulator training wing of the Heroica Escuela Naval Militar set to open in the fourth quarter of 2014. The school is where future officers are trained for the General Corps of the Mexican Navy. The simulators will use the NAUTIS Naval Task Force software module.


SeaBotix ROV Joins US Navy MCM Exercise in San Diego
The SeaBotix (San Diego, California) vLBV300 ROV was part of an MCM exercise by Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training and Evaluation Unit One in San Diego. Two small combat rubber raiding crafts (CRRC) containing the vLBV and an AUV were launched from a C-130 aircraft via parachute to the ocean off southern California and followed by a contingent of U.S. Navy EOD technicians. The equipment hit the surface of the ocean at up to 6 meters per second in the partially inflated CRRCs. The team then readied the gear and deployed the AUV to scan for the targets. Once a suspicious object was located, target data were uploaded to the SeaBotix vLBV control console, and then the vLBV was piloted to the target for positive identification. The target was confirmed at 54 meters in less than three hours, significantly reducing typical operation time and personnel.


2014:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT
2013:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
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