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October 2012 Issue

UK Royal Navy Presents Design of Type-26 Ship
The U.K. Ministry of Defence unveiled in August the design of the Royal Navy’s next-generation multimission, due to come into service after 2020.

The Type-26 global combat ship will help sustain industrial surface-warship capabilities in the U.K. after the construction of the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. It will be used in combat and counter-piracy operations, and in support of humanitarian and disaster-relief missions.

Since 2010, the ministry has been working with BAE Systems (Farnborough, England) to determine the ship’s basic capabilities and baseline design. The program can now progress to the vessel’s detailed specifications. With a basic displacement of 5,400 tonnes, the Type-26 ship will be around 148 meters long. It is expected to feature vertical missile silos; a hangar to accommodate a Merlin or Wildcat Helicopter and a flexible mission space for unmanned air, surface and underwater vehicles; and sensors.


JHSV-1 Completes US Navy Acceptance Trials
The first-in-class joint high-speed vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1), under construction at Austal USA (Mobile, Alabama), has successfully completed acceptance trials in the Gulf of Mexico, the company announced in late August. The U.S. Navy conducted comprehensive tests of the ship’s major systems and equipment to include the propulsion plant, ship handling and auxiliary systems. The ship had high levels of completion, according to the Navy.

These trials were the last major milestone before delivery of the Spearhead to the Navy, which was expected in September. Two more JHSVs are under construction at Austal’s Mobile shipyard.


Diving Simulator for Swedish Navy Certified by Germanischer Lloyd
Haux-Life-Support GmbH (Karlsbad-Ittersbach, Germany) has gained Germanischer Lloyd certification for its Haux-Hydra 160 diving simulator for the Royal Swedish Navy. The simulator is the 10th to receive this certification.

The Haux-Hydra 160 system enables wet and dry diving, saturation diving, controls and supervision, data handling and processing, and training procedures. Each chamber—one diving chamber (wet) and one living chamber (dry for treatment)—has a maximum operating pressure of 16 bar, equivalent to 160-meter seawater depth.

The simulator, located in Karlskrona, Sweden, can be used for the performance of dives and tests for civil and military purposes as well as treatments for divers.


SeaFox, CUSV Deployed in Navy Tests
The SeaFox, a one-shot mine disposal vehicle delivered to the U.S. Navy by ATLAS North America (Virginia Beach, Virginia), performed at the Trident Warrior 2012 U.S. Navy Fleet Experiment more than 15 mine-hunting neutralization missions from the Fleet Class Common Unmanned Surface Vessel (CUSV), developed by Textron’s (Wilmington, Massachusetts) AAI Corp. (Hunt Valley, Maryland).

The missions were carried out against both moored and bottom mines and under differing sea conditions in a practice minefield offshore of the Marine Corps Base at Camp Pendleton, California, Atlus said in September.

During the tests, Textron/AAI used its CUSV with an L-3 Klein (Salem, New Hampshire) 5000 V2 Side Scan Sonar to investigate a suspected minefield. When detecting a mine-like object, its coordinates were inputted into the SeaFox. A second CUSV then remotely deployed the SeaFox for identifying the exercise mines, followed by a simulated neutralization.


US Navy Wins Case to Build ASW Test Range In Endangered Right Whale Calving Area
A U.S. district court judge in September ruled in favor of the U.S. Navy’s plans to build an undersea range for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) training, which 12 environmental groups had challenged, fearing the sonar tests would harm the endangered North Atlantic right whales.

The $100 million range, which has not yet begun construction, will be located off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, on right whales’ only known calving grounds. It will consist of undersea cables and transducer nodes in a 500-square-nautical-mile area of the ocean. The instrumented area would be connected to shore via a single trunk cable.

Submarines, ships and aircraft all presently conduct ASW training in this area and will be the principal users of the range. The Navy said it does “not expect to cause any significant change to training already occurring in the area.”

The environmental groups argued that the Navy selected the site without the surveys necessary to assess densities for marine mammals. The court was satisfied that the Navy had complied with National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Administrative Procedure Act.


2013:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

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