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February 2012 Issue

Coast Guard Cutter Healy Cuts Path For Renda's Fuel Delivery to Nome, Alaska
The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy extended a seven-month science mission in January to help deliver a fuel shipment to the 3,500 citizens of Nome, Alaska, averting a looming energy crisis. The delivery marks the first time a wintertime fuel transfer has taken place by sea in western Alaska, the Coast Guard said.

The icebreaker cleared a path in the Bering Sea for the 370-foot Russian tanker vessel Renda, which was delivering a 1.3 million-gallon fuel shipment. Renda began its 5,000-mile journey in mid-December, picking up diesel fuel in South Korea and unleaded gasoline in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, the Coast Guard said. A November storm prevented a prewinter fuel shipment that would have lasted until spring.

Prior to helping deliver fuel to Nome, the Healy had worked with NASA, the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent and the National Science Foundation in various scientific research missions in the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean.

Navy Christens Littoral Combat Ship Coronado
The U.S. Navy christened the fourth littoral combat ship (LCS 4) Coronado at Austal USA's (Mobile, Alabama) shipyard in January. Coronado is an Independence-class ship with a trimaran hull design, shallow draft, three weapon zones and a flight deck. The ship is designed to counter mines, submarines and fast surface craft threats in coastal regions, the Navy said.

The ship is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep. Coronado will address a critical capabilities gap in the littorals.

US Navy's Military Sealift Command Undergoes Organizational Realignment
The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command (MSC) announced in January that it is reorganizing in order to increase efficiency and cut costs.

Changes include a new service support program, repositioning three of its key senior executive service members and adjusting the reporting structure of several field activities, the U.S. Navy said. Continuing in operation are the Combat Logistics Force, Special Mission, Prepositioning and Sealift programs.

"MSC is an agile force, and we are proactively streamlining and improving our organization so that we will be ready for anything that comes our way in this challenging fiscal environment," said Adm. Mark H. Buzby, commander of MSC. "I am confident going into the future."

US Navy Receives Future USS San Diego
The U.S. Navy accepted in December its newest amphibious transport dock ship, the future USS San Diego (LPD 22) from Huntington Ingalls Industries (Newport News, Virginia).

San Diego is the sixth ship in the LPD 17 San Antonio class and the first in that class to be constructed with the class build plan that uses lessons learned in design and construction of LPDs 17 through 21, the Navy said.

"I'm very proud to take delivery of this vital warfighting asset for the fleet," said Jay Stefany, LPD 17 class program manager for the Navy's Program Executive Office Ships. "San Diego has performed very well in her testing and trials and is the most complete ship of the class delivered to date."

The next steps following this official transfer from the shipbuilder to the Navy will be crew move and transit it to San Diego, California.

The commissioning ceremony is planned for May, the Navy said.

JMS Seeks Weapons System for High-Speed Attack Craft GHOST
Juliet Marine Systems Inc. (JMS), based in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, announced in January its plans to select a weapons integrator for its high-speed attack craft, GHOST.

GHOST is designed to counter swarm attacks in strategic littoral waters like the Strait of Hormuz. Its agility and speed combined with large fuel capacity and heavy weaponry would make it an ideal deterrent against threats to large fleets from pirates or Iran trying to close shipping channels with swarms of high-speed boats, JMS said.

JMS will seek International Traffic in Arms Regulations approval of international partners to support deployment of GHOSTs.

JMS President and CEO Gregory Sancoff said, "GHOST would be a very important and cost-effective security tool to exert a constant presence in this troubled region."


2013:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

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