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Environmental Monitoring

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June 2012 Issue

ClassNK, NAPA Group to Offer SEEMP Solution Later This Year
ClassNK (Tokyo, Japan) and NAPA Group (Helsinki, Finland) announced in May a collaboration to provide a solution for the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP). The regulation, developed by the International Maritime Organization, will come into force on January 1, 2013, and is intended to mitigate the environmental impact of shipping operations. ClassNK and NAPA are working closely with Imabari Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. (Imabari, Japan).

The solutin will combine modules to optimize trim, route and speed with an analytics service to offer operational efficiency and decision support. It will allow owners and operators to respond and adapt operations in real time to capitalize on latent efficiencies within operations in order to increase eco-efficiency and reduce fuel consumption to meet the SEEMP, the companies said.

A trial version is expected to be completed within the year. It will then undergo real-world testing on vessels owned and operated by an Imabari Group shipping company. Feedback from this verification testing will be used to further develop and refine the system prior to final release.

“When married with sound management practice, improvement of latent efficiencies, optimization of trim, ballast and floating position, and implementation of voyage optimization systems, an electronic approach to SEEMP can achieve as much as 15 to 20 percent in fuel economy, depending on the vessel type,” Juha Heikinheimo, president of NAPA Group, said.


Port of Los Angeles Adopts International Clean Air Program
The Port of Los Angeles became in May the first seaport in North America and the Pacific Rim to adopt a clean air program that rewards vessel operators for voluntary engine, fuel and technology enhancements that reduce emissions from ships, the single largest source of air pollution from port-related operations, beyond the International Maritime Organization’s regulatory standards.

The Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners formally approved an Environmental Ship Index (ESI) program to take effect on July 1.

The ESI is a Web-based tool developed by the World Ports Climate Initiative of the International Association of Ports and Harbors that can be tailored to fit a port’s operational and regional requirements. Fourteen European ports have already adopted it.

Diesel particulate matter (DPM) and sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships calling at the Port of Los Angeles decreased 68 percent and 74 percent, respectively, between 2005 and 2010. Los Angeles wants the ESI to further encourage the building and deployment of cleaner-burning ships in the TransPacific trade lane.

The Port of Los Angeles developed its ESI with input from the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association and other stakeholders and has committed $450,000 to jump-start the program.

Initially, up to 30 percent of the ships calling at the port are expected to qualify for ESI incentives. Thirty percent participation would cut DPM emissions by 16 tons within the first year and reduce emissions of other primary pollutants, namely nitrogen oxides, SOx and CO2.


BiotaTools, Oil Majors Develop Third-Generation Biosensors
BiotaTools AS (Stavanger, Norway), in cooperation with Statoil (Stavanger) and ConocoPhillips Co. (Houston, Texas), is developing third-generation animal biosensors based on the methods used in environmental risk assessment (ERA) of chemicals and discharges to facilitate the use of acceptance criteria in the ERA.

These biosensors will conduct real-time aquatic monitoring and document animal health status and be capable of monitoring healthy and polluted sites to record environmental performance, BiotaTools said in May.

The animals involved in the development of these sensors are nonswimming, filter-feeding organisms and bivalves, such as mussels, clams and scallops. Each organism is set up with several sensors, and its performance, for instance, in growth, reproduction, energy utilization, heart rate and valve gaping, is monitored continuously. Over time, each organism will establish its own performance reference line, and water quality trends in its surrounding environment can be monitored as improving or worsening.

The first prototype will be used to gather data for programming the first set of sensors, which Statoil will put in place for testing by the end of this summer in Skrugard field. The data will be available by the end of the year and will be used to design a deepwater offshore version of the sensors.

Statoil will also place a lander north of Bodoe, Norway, by the end of the year. Additional installations in 2013 are under discussion.


Rolls-Royce Approves Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluids
Terresolve Technologies Ltd. (Mentor, Ohio) announced in late April that Rolls-Royce plc (London, England) has approved its EnviroLogic 3000 line for use in its products. The series, which comprises five hydraulic fluids with distinct viscosity grades, is readily biodegradable, nontoxic and directly replaces petroleum analogs.

The fluids, which break down into natural parts within 28 days, are safe to use in environmentally sensitive applications, and there are no long-term negative environmental effects in the event of a leak or spill, according to Terresolve.

Environmental fluids thus far used in the offshore industry have been unable to withstand harsh conditions, such as extreme temperatures and moisture, the company said.

“Terresolve products are different than petroleum-based products and other eco-friendly products,” Terresolve CEO Mark Miller said. “Our fluids utilize what we call biopolyolefins, which are similar to synthetic polyalphaolefins and fall into the ISO 6743 Environmental Hydraulic Fluids Classification ‘HEPR’ category. Most other biofluids use synthetic ester (HEES) technology, which is susceptible to oxidation and hydrolysis.”


2013:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
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