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January 2011 Issue

Navy Sets New World Record with Electromagnetic Railgun Demonstration
The Office of Naval Research (ONR) successfully conducted a world-record 33-megajoule shot of the electromagnetic railgun at Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division on December 10.

"Today's railgun test demonstrates the tactical relevance of this technology, which could one day complement traditional surface ship combat systems," said RAdm. Nevin Carr, chief of naval research. "The 33-megajoule shot means the Navy can fire projectiles at least 110 nautical miles, placing sailors and Marines at a safe standoff distance and out of harm's way, and the high velocities achievable are tactically relevant for air and missile defense."

In 2008, ONR conducted a 10-megajoule shot. The latest demonstration represents progress toward developing a gun that could hit targets almost 20 times farther than conventional ship combat systems.

Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding to Continue Development of LHA Replacement
Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Inc. (Pascagoula, Mississippi) was recently awarded a contract modification for additional planning and advanced engineering services in support of the LHA replacement (LHA[R]) Flight 0 amphibious assault ship (LHA 7).

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Completes 100,000th Recovery
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) made its 100,000th arrested aircraft recovery on November 7. The accomplishment is particularly noteworthy given the carrier has only been in service 12 years, the U.S. Navy said. CVN-75 is operating in support of ground troops in Afghanistan.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit Returns From Afghanistan
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 Battalion headquarters (approximately 20 sailors) returned to Guam on October 13 following a seven-month deployment to Southern Afghanistan in direct support of Commander, Joint Task Force Paladin. The headquarters element had been based in Southern Afghanistan, where they commanded and controlled counter-improvised explosive device (IED) teams.

The unit was successful in working with the other U.S. armed forces explosives teams as they guarded against IEDs threatening U.S. and coalition forces.

During deployment to Afghanistan, Combined Joint Task Force Paladin coordinated more than 1,200 combat missions conducted by multiservice explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) companies, counter-IED systems experts and three combined explosive exploitation cells. They found and cleared approximately 600 IEDs, destroyed 150 arms caches, destroyed more than 49,000 pounds of enemy ordnance and conducted more than 410 post-blast analyses. These analyses provided critical forensic evidence in support of follow-on targeting of violent extremist networks, the Navy said. They operated two battalions across three regional commands and supported 63 EOD teams.

ONR Scientist Receives Award for Advancements in Fuel Cell Technology
Dr. Richard Carlin, director of the Sea Warfare and Weapons Department in the Office of Naval Research (ONR), was recently honored with the 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Award. This award recognizes Carlin not only for his efforts to advance fuel cell technology, but also for his more than 20 years of promoting partnerships and building coalitions in industry, ONR said.

Recent successes in the application of hydrogen-powered fuel cells include the Ion Tiger unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which set a world endurance record of 26 hours. Larger hydrogen fuel cell systems in vehicles are also being tested ashore.

Fuel cells have the tactical benefits of low heat and noise signature and emissions, and the U.S. Navy expects them to play a role in achieving its goal to cut fuel use by 50 percent in its commercial vehicle fleet by 2015.

Small hydrogen fuel cells are also being tested as possible power sources for unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs). A variety of fuel cells—solid oxide, direct borohydride and hydrogen—are being tested as air-independent power sources for UUV electric propulsion systems.

A major technical challenge in bringing fuel cells into mass production for the Navy and the public is efficiently refining fuel, such as hydrogen, in sufficient quantities, the Navy said.


2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2011:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC

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