Home | Contact ST  

Marine Electronics

2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2011:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC


August 2011 Issue

Converteam Equipment Passes Testing Milestone at Navy Site
Converteam Inc. (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) has successfully tested the Zumwalt-class destroyer DDG 1000's high-voltage integrated power system to full power at the U.S. Navy's land-based test site in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Converteam announced in July.

The DDG 1000 is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to leverage an all-electric architecture, providing electric power for both propulsion and ship services. Converteam was responsible for the program's high-voltage system design, commissioning and testing at the land-based test site.

The technology tested involved one of two shipboard shaft lines, one main and one auxiliary gas turbine generator set, all four high-voltage switchboards, harmonic filters and two of the four shipboard electrical zones. One of the two propulsion tandem advanced induction motors and their associated variable speed drives were also tested.

Converteam supplied systems integration and hardware, which includes the propulsion motors, variable speed drives, high-voltage switchboards and harmonic filters for the main and auxiliary turbine-generators.

"Converteam's expertise in system integration and equipment design has been further demonstrated through this milestone. Our people are providing the Navy with the technology and dedicated support essential to enable their mission at any time and in any location," said Paul Thompson, Converteam's vice president of navy business and government affairs.

For more information, visit www.converteam.com.

Submersible Echosounder Deployed at Tidal Energy Site
The University of Washington retrieved in June a BioSonics Inc.'s (Seattle, Washington) DT-X SUB split-beam echosounder after a one-month deployment in northern Admiralty Inlet, Washington. The location is a proposed Snohomish Public Utility District tidal energy demonstration project site.

The DT-X SUB, an autonomous scientific echosounder packaged in a subsea pressure housing with integrated power management and data storage systems, is being used to detect, categorize and enumerate the proposed tidal energy site's pelagic fish, invertebrate and marine mammal species. Working with NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, the University of Washington intends to allow marine hydrokinetic site and device developers to install tidal turbines in suitable locations while minimizing behavioral effects on aquatic organisms.

"When [the DT-X SUB is] down there, collecting data, it's completely self-contained. There's no line to the surface, no signal to the surface," said Jim Thomson, a University of Washington oceanographer.

After programming the configuration and duty cycle at the surface, the team deployed the echosounder to the seafloor affixed to an Oceanscience Group (Oceanside, California) Sea Spider tripod instrument mount. The DT-X SUB system automatically collected and logged water column backscatter data from split-beam transducers. The echosounder was programmed to collect data every other hour in a 10 percent operational duty cycle, alternating between pinging and sleep modes. For more information, visit www.biosonicsinc.com.

University of Luebeck Wins SAUC-E '11 AUV Challenge
The University of Luebeck from Germany won the sixth Student Autonomous Underwater Challenge Europe, SAUC-E '11, held at the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) from July 4 to 10. Competing against nine other teams, the university's Hanse AUV got the highest score for successfully completing a number of assigned mission tasks.

The second prize went to the 2010 champions from the University of Girona in Spain with their AUV Sparus. DFKI Bremen from Germany came in third place, closely followed by ENSTA Bretagne.

An international jury of experts awarded teams that not only built the most efficient, reliable and compelling vehicles but also stood out for technical merit, craftsmanship, safety of design, marketing and fund-raising. The winner's prizes for the first four seeded are €4,000, €3,000, €2,000 and €1,500, which will be used by the team to improve their equipment for future competitions. All other teams received €1,000 each to encourage their work. For more information, visit www.sauc-europe.org.

JW Fisher's Magnetometer Used in Diving, Archeology Projects
JW Fishers (East Taunton, Massachusetts) new hand-held PT-1 magnetometer, which is designed to locate iron and steel objects underwater, is being used in applications from archaeology to commercial diving, the company said in June, citing several examples.

Cosmos Agencia Maritima (Callao, Peru) recently used a PT-1 pipe tracking magnetometer for its underwater search and recovery projects. Francisco Paolillo Tapia, Cosmos manager of special operations, said the PT-1 was excellent for finding anchors, chains and other objects buried in the seabed.

The underwater archeology branch of North Carolina's Department of Cultural Resources used the PT-1 in a project to recover of artifacts from the wreck site of Blackbeard's flagship, Queen Anne's Revenge. JW Fishers said magnetometers can have trouble differentiating between the multiple pieces of ferrous metal on a wreck, making it nearly impossible to pinpoint individual targets. But the PT-1 can pinpoint which items that may be surrounded with iron and steel targets. The first anchor from the Queen Anne's Revenge was recently raised from where it had by lying for the last 300 years, JW Fishers said.

DUC Diving (Lelystad, Netherlands) used the PT-1 to locate and mark the position of a pipeline running under the seafloor in order to prevent it from being damaged during a dredging operation.

JW Fishers said divers not only tracked the route of the pipe, but also found and removed a number of objects from the ocean bottom that could have damaged the dredge. For more information, visit www.jwfishers.com.


2012:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC
2011:  JAN | FEB | MARCH | APRIL | MAY | JUNE | JULY | AUG | SEPT | OCT | NOV | DEC


-back to top-

Sea Technology is read worldwide in more than 110 countries by management, engineers, scientists and technical personnel working in industry, government and educational research institutions. Readers are involved with oceanographic research, fisheries management, offshore oil and gas exploration and production, undersea defense including antisubmarine warfare, ocean mining and commercial diving.