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2011  Sea Technology Magazine Annual Index

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January 2011 magazine cover image

January 2011 Issue

ANNUAL REVIEW
& FORECAST

Volume 52, No. 1

COVER
A deepwater mushroom soft coral, Anthomastus ritteri, photographed at 330 meters’ depth during a site characterization of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) being conducted by the Institute for Applied Marine Ecology (IfAME) at California State University Monterey Bay. The photo was taken by the Beagle, a remotely operated vehicle owned by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and operated by Marine Applied Research & Exploration (MARE). (Photo courtesy of IfAME, MBNMS, MARE and TNC)



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Review & Forecast


Features






February 2011 Issue

INSTRUMENTATION:
MEASUREMENT PROCESSING
& ANALYSIS


COVER
Predeployment staging of the Saco River Coastal Observation System telemetry buoy and cage with a Sea-Bird Electronics Inc. (Bellevue, Washington) SBE 37-SM MicroCAT, a Teledyne RDI (Poway, California) Workhorse ADCP and an Aanderaa Data Instruments (Bergen, Norway) recording current meter off Wood Island, Maine, aboard the RV Gulf Challenger in March 2010. (Photo courtesy of Shaun Gill, University of New England’s Marine Science Education and Research Center)

 


Features





March 2011 Issue

ELECTRONIC CHARTING
VESSEL MANAGEMENT
PORTS & HARBORS
DREDGING
HOMELAND SECURITY


COVER
Results from an echosounder survey of Tokyo’s harbor, which was taken in January for a demonstration of a Kongsberg Maritime (Kongsberg, Norway) EM 2040 high-resolution multibeam echosounder. Each of the stones used to armor the harbor is approximately two meters wide and 40 centimeters high. To give optimal position resolution, the survey used a Kongsberg Seapath 330+ receiving both global positioning system and GLONASS data and a Fugro SeaSTAR AS (Oslo, Norway) 3610. (Photo credit: Nippon Kayo Co. Ltd.)

 

Features





April 2011 Issue

OFFSHORE TECHNOLOGY
ALTERNATIVE ENERGY &
OCEAN ENGINEERING


COVER
Workers examine Ocean Power Technologies’ (Pennington, New Jersey) PB150 PowerBuoy, a new type of wave energy device with a peak-rated power output of 150 kilowatts that is designed for use in arrays of grid-connected power generation projects. The device, which was built and assembled in Invergordon, Scotland, will soon be deployed about 33 nautical miles away on the country’s northeast coast. A second PB150 is under construction in the U.S. for a proposed utility-scale project in Oregon. (Photo credit: Ocean Power Technologies)

 

Features





May 2011 Issue

COMMUNICATIONS
TELEMETRY
DATA PROCESSING


COVER
One of five seafloor nodes that interconnect CSnet International Inc.’s (Melbourne, Florida) and its subsidiary CSnet (CYPRUS) Ltd.’s (Limassol, Cyprus) Offshore Communications Backbone (OCB) being deployed in December in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. This OCB is presently serving as the Tsunami Warning and Early Response System of Cyprus but is deployed in an area of increasing hydrocarbon exploration activity in order to support oil and gas development as well as environmental monitoring. (Photo courtesy of CSnet International Inc.)

 


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June 2011 Issue

SEAFLOOR MAPPING
SONAR SYSTEMS
VESSELS


COVER
This 3D point cloud image of a downed, storm-damaged offshore platform was taken with BlueView Technology’s (Seattle, Washington) BV5000 3D mechanical scanning sonar. The scans were taken from an ROV on the seafloor, looking upward at the structure, providing data that downward-looking systems cannot. The data were used to determine an “as found” condition of the entire platform to aid decommission planning. Individual scan data were mosaicked into a single fully rotational data set using Leica Geosystems’ (St. Gallen, Switzerland) topographic laser scanner software.

 


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July 2011 Issue

DECK GEAR
CABLE
CONNECTORS &
POWER SYSTEMS


COVER
Hawaii Underwater Research Laboratory’s manned research sub Pisces V at a depth of 950 meters offshore Oahu during a dive in October. BIRNS Inc. (Oxnard, California) is the laboratory’s exclusive supplier of its hull penetrators, 28 of which are on Pisces V. In addition to molded outboard cable assemblies, BIRNS outfitted the sub with oil-filled cable assemblies with unique double-ferrule hydraulic fittings. In this shot, Pisces V was deploying a LinkQuest Inc. (San Diego, California) TrackLink transponder on the seafloor for tracking calibration of the laboratory research vessel Ka‘imikai-o-Kanaloa. (Photo credit: Colin Wollerman)

 


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August 2011 Issue

OCEAN RESOURCES
DEVELOPMENT
COASTAL ZONE
MANAGEMENT


COVER
The Florida Atlantic University team readies its human-powered submarine, Talon 1, at the International Submarine Races at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, held from June 27 to July 1. Measuring 125 inches long and 25 inches wide, Talon 1 reached a top speed of 6.814 knots, winning prizes for the absolute fastest speed and the fastest speed in the one-person, propeller-driven category. Talon 1 took second place for overall performance, competing against 27 submarines from 23 other teams. For more results, see the feature article on page 49. (Photo courtesy of Mark Mercer)

 


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September 2011 Issue

GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION
SEAFLOOR ENGINEERING


COVER
Geo Caspian, one of the newest additions to the Fugro-Geoteam (Olso, Norway) C-Class fleet, acquiring seismic data offshore Tanzania. The survey, conducted for Ophir Energy (London, England) in early 2011, used a Sodera G. GUN as the source and 12 Sercel (Nantes, France) Sentinel 6,000-meter streamers with 100-meter separations. (Photo credit: Fugro-Geoteam)

 




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October 2011 Issue

GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION
SEAFLOOR ENGINEERING


COVER
The Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados performs maintenance on its oceanographic and meteorological Enderrocat buoy in Palma Bay, Mallorca Island. The mooring produces atmospheric data variables (e.g., wind, atmospheric pressure and air temperature) and variables measured in the water column (e.g., currents and temperature) from the surface to a depth of 20 meters. It takes measurements every 10 minutes and transfers the data via VHF radio to the coastal station in Calanova, Spain. Data are then transferred via the Internet to servers for preprocessing, quality control and publication on the institute’s website. (Photo credit: Eduardo Infantes Oanes)

 




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November 2011 Issue

UNDERSEA DEFENSE
ANTISUBMARINE WARFARE


COVER
Mine countermeasures ships from Britain, Pakistan and the United States travel in formation during Arabian Gauntlet 2011 as a CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopter assigned to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 15 flies overhead. This year’s exercises, held in the Gulf of Arabia in April, were designed to refine mine and surface warfare capabilities and improve offshore infrastructure protection in the region. (Photo credit: U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist First Class Lynn Friant)

 




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December 2011 Issue

DIVING, UNDERWATER
VEHICLES & IMAGING


COVER
Scientific diver Jeff Godfrey of the University of Connecticut explores a wave-cut terrace associated with the Pleistocene ice age in the Exumas region of the Bahamas at a depth of 85 meters seawater. The Bahamas is lined with these vertical wall habitats extending from the shallows to the abyss, providing a full spectrum of depths for scientific investigation. The dive team utilizes mixed-gas, closed-circuit rebreathers to enable efficient access to these mesophotic coral ecosystems from 60 to 150 meters seawater, beyond the reach of conventional scuba. (Photo by Michael Lombardi, courtesy National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program).

 




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Sea Technology is read worldwide in more than 110 countries by management, engineers, scientists and technical personnel working in industry, government and educational research institutions. Readers are involved with oceanographic research, fisheries management, offshore oil and gas exploration and production, undersea defense including antisubmarine warfare, ocean mining and commercial diving.